Stories on maker education and innovation 

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Import 3D Scenes Into Minecraft using MCEdit2 #makered #minecraft #minecraftedu

In our classes for young makers, we discuss how digital fabrication technology will be a game-changer.   In future work, more jobs will involve converting digital content into physical things through technologies like 3D printing, CNC, and other similar technologies.   Students love playing video games and enjoy the opportunity to learn how to make their own game worlds.   At the Museum of Aviation in Warner Robins, GA, I had the opportunity to teach a workshop on building amazing game worlds in Minecraft using TinkerCAD.com.   It’s so much fun to share these lessons with students!  After guiding the students through some of the basic operations of TinkerCAD.com, we encourage the students to play and build projects that they care about.   It was cool to see their finished work in Minecraft.   While the students think about “playing and building,” they are actually exposed to many engineering and math skills too.   The students learned how to displace objects in 3D space, rotate objects, scale objects, perform measurement, and many other mathematical ideas.

Some of the students attempted to build a Minecraft roller coaster structure.   In a secondary step, we added Minecraft train tracks and red stone power rails to power our Minecarts.  It turned out great!

Minecraft Roller coaster

One of our students decided to build a huge Minecraft creeper!  A friend of mine from Ampersand Arts in MaconMacon, helped build the huge snow man shown below.

Creeper, snowman, and friends

You can see a car, tie fighter, and rockets built by the students.

Car, Tie Fighter, Rockets

Very proud of the focus and work of our students.  I’m also thankful to my friend Jake who helped coach the class with me.

To support parents, students, and teachers, I wanted to share a few tips to enable you to build stuff like this in Minecraft.

What’s a schematic file?

A schematic file contains 3D model data to transfer content into Minecraft.    You can find schematic data files on web sites like http://www.minecraft-schematics.com/ .   You can also create 3D models and convert them to schematic files using TinkerCAD.com .

How do you import schematic files into Minecraft? 

I wanted to share a quick tutorial video on using MCEdit to import schematic content into Minecraft. Before doing the steps mentioned in this video, make sure to install Minecraft on your computer and create at least one world.

Steps:
1. Open your web browser and navigate to http://www.mcedit.net/ .
2. Click the “Download” menu option at the top.
3. You will want to download the latest version appropriate for your operating system. In this tutorial, we will download version 2 beta 6 for Windows. (64 bit version)
4. After the install program has been downloaded, execute the program and specify a location to store “mcedit.” For this demo, we will store MCEdit in “c:\games\mcedit.”  Using our file explorer, we will navigate to the MCEdit folder.
5. Open the “mcedit2-win64-2.0.0-beta6” folder.
6. Run MCEdit
7. In the panel on the left, MCEdit lists the minecraft game worlds saved by your current user account. For this demo, we’ll open the world called “demo.”
8. Select “demo”.
9. Click the button “edit.”
10. You can move around this gameworld using “WASD” navigation style.
11. You can change the direction the player is looking by holding the “right” mouse button and dragging the mouse.
12. To import a schematic file, click the “Import/Export > Import”
13. The system will open a file box enabling you to select a schematic. For this demo, we’ll select a small car created by one my students.
14. The XYZ numbers here enable you to adjust the location of the schematic content. In my case, I’ll edit the “y” coordinate to make sure to car connects to the ground.
15. Click the “confirm” button to accept the schematic content into the world.
16. Keep in mind, you’re not done yet. You need to save the session by clicking the “MCEdit” menu followed by “save world.”
17. You’re all done. Close MCEdit.
18. Open up Minecraft to test that your schematic file shows up correctly in your world!

 

We want to say thank you to the Museum of Aviation of Warner Robins, GA for enabling us to share this workshop.   Make sure to check out their fantastic STEM education workshops here.  We also want to give a shout out to the folks at TinkerCAD.com and MCEdit.NET.   Without their care and craft, we wouldn’t be able to inspire these students as makers of the future.  I really appreciate their work.

Make sure to check out our next workshop!!

Robotics: Building upon the programming skills introduced early in the program, students will have the opportunity to build robots from scratch using the mBot kit.   Students will love customizing their mBot using puzzle based programming and the easy to assemble construction experience.   Students take home their mbot to continue the tinkering fun at home.

Student registration includes a complete mBot robotics kit from Makeblock.cc.

http://www.makeblock.cc/mbot/

  • Workshop length: 3 hours
  • Cost: $20 + $75(cost of mBot kit)
  • Register for the workshop today!
  • Dates – Dec 3rd from 1pm to 4pm
  • Location – SparkMacon Makerspace – 557 Cherry St, Macon, GA (parking/directions)
  • All ages and experience levels are welcome and the workshops are a great activity for the entire family. Parents and kids can also both attend under the same registration fee!

 

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How To Create Collaborative Digital Art using #JavaScript

Published on October 21, 2016 by in technology

loop / rotate / translate

In this tutorial, we’ll explore the process of building a digital drawing canvas where artists can simultaneously collaborate. You can test drive the collaborative drawing canvas below. To draw, just click and drag your mouse.

Open drawing area in another window.

Complete Code Sample

To explore building a collaborative digital art canvas, we’ll start with a very simple example. This code is based on the p5 processing js framework. You can download this sample code and other 3D art examples from my github repo. In general, this javascript code needs to setup a connection to my Firebase database, setup a list of colors, setup code to react to drawing events, and give the artist a way to contribute drawing events to the system. In the rest of this blog post, we’ll break this code down.

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var database;
var colorOptions;

function setup() {
    createCanvas(1024, 768);

    // Initialize Firebase
    var config = {
    apiKey: "...",
    authDomain: "changeme.firebaseapp.com",
    databaseURL: "https://changeme.firebaseio.com",
    storageBucket: "",
    };
    firebase.initializeApp(config);
    database = firebase.database();

    //make a list of colors in an array....
        colorOptions = new Array();
    colorOptions[0] = "#faa916"
    colorOptions[1] = "#6d676e"
    colorOptions[2] = "#1b1b1e"
    colorOptions[3] = "#96031a"

    //pull points from firebase and draw them...
    var pointRef = firebase.database().ref('points');
    pointRef.on('child_added', function(data) {

        // So... a new point has been added. Get the data.
        var aPoint = data.val();

        //set the color based on point
        fill(aPoint.color);

        //draw the point
        ellipse(aPoint.x, aPoint.y, 10, 10);
    });



}

function draw() {
    if (mouseIsPressed) {      
        //get current time
        var date = new Date();
        var m = date.getMinutes();

        //select a color option based on the minutes
        var i = m % 4;
       
        // make a point capturing location(x,y) and color
        var aPoint = {}
        aPoint.x = mouseX;
        aPoint.y = mouseY;
        aPoint.color = colorOptions[i];

        //add point to firebase ...
        database.ref("points").push(aPoint);   
    }
}

Setting up our drawing space and Firebase connection

P5 is a easy 2D JavaScript framework for drawing stuff. In the “setup” function, p5 enables programmers to establish their workspace. In our case, we have 3 jobs: create a canvas, connect to our Firebase database, and tell the system how it should handle drawing events. In the following code, we create a drawing surface called a canvas that’s 1024 pixels by 768 pixels. The rest of the code establishes a connection to my firebase instance. Firebase is a real-time database in the Google family of products. From a JavaScript programmers point of view, it provides an easy way to capture data and push that new data to other users of your app or experience. In our case, the moment that one user starts drawing, all other users will see the result instantly with no refreshing. Experienced programmers will also notice that you don’t insert data using SQL, you just ask the system to store JSON.

Make sure to learn more about Google Firebase at https://firebase.google.com/. In my case, I established a database instance that’s writable to the public. This works great for public wikis or collaborative public art. You can also secure your database instance with authentication and login methods. Check out their documentation for details.

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    createCanvas(1024, 768);

    // Initialize Firebase
    var config = {
    apiKey: "...",
    authDomain: "changeme.firebaseapp.com",
    databaseURL: "https://changeme.firebaseio.com",
    storageBucket: "",
    };
    firebase.initializeApp(config);
    database = firebase.database();

In this tutorial, let’s change the drawing colors of our collaborative canvas with time. In this case, we’ll provide 4 options in the code below.

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        colorOptions = new Array();
    colorOptions[0] = "#faa916"
    colorOptions[1] = "#6d676e"
    colorOptions[2] = "#1b1b1e"
    colorOptions[3] = "#96031a"

Let’s draw something!

In the following code, we get the browser to listen for changes from our Firebase database. When changes occur to our points list, we draw stuff. When a child is added, we grab a single point, set the fill color, and draw a small circle at the location.

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    var pointRef = firebase.database().ref('points');
    pointRef.on('child_added', function(data) {
        // So... a new point has been added. Get the data.
        var aPoint = data.val();

        //set the color based on point
        fill(aPoint.color);

        //draw the point
        ellipse(aPoint.x, aPoint.y, 10, 10);
    });

How do users draw?

For our simple collaborative canvas, artists draw on the canvas by simply clicking and dragging their mouse. In the following code, we detect mouse clicks, the location of the mouse click, and pick a color based on time.

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function draw() {
    if (mouseIsPressed) {      
        //get current time
        var date = new Date();
        var m = date.getMinutes();

        //select a color option based on the minutes
        var i = m % 4;
       
        // make a point capturing location(x,y) and color
        var aPoint = {}
        aPoint.x = mouseX;
        aPoint.y = mouseY;
        aPoint.color = colorOptions[i];

        //add point to firebase ...
        database.ref("points").push(aPoint);   
    }
}

If you enjoyed this tutorial, you’re going to LOVE the following art and code festival we’re organizing tomorrow. It’s an opportunity for artists, designers, and coders in Middle, GA to connect and invent new crowd sourced art experiences. It’s going to be a blast! Macon GDG has organized the content and teaching to be accessible to artists and designers interested in growing their coding skills. We’ll be building amazing 3D collaborative art experiences like the following:

This prototype piece was presented by Dr. Allen during our last Open Make night at SparkMacon Makerspace.

I want to give a shout out to our friends at Google Developer Group of Macon and Dr. Robert Allen from Mercer. It was a blast brainstorming and implementing Macon’s first Google DevFest together

  • Google DevFest: A festival for software developers, artists, and creative thinkers.
    Explore CrowdSourced Art using tools like ThreeJS and Firebase.com, an amazing realtime database framework.
  • Learn more at http://devfest.cs.mercer.edu/
  • When: October 22, 2016 – 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Where: Mercer University Science and Engineering Building

Join the community of SparkMacon Makerspace

Central GA’s first makerspace w/ art + tech tools & expertise to help you learn STEAM skills, collaborate w/ creatives & grow your creative business.

Join our Facebook Community at https://www.facebook.com/groups/sparkmacon/

Spark Macon

 
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5 Powerful JavaScript Frameworks for 2D and 3D Graphics #javascript

three js

  • https://threejs.org/ – A 3D graphics library for HTML and JavaScript. Make sure to check out sample code here and at https://stemkoski.github.io/Three.js/.   Writing Google Cardboard apps?  Check out https://vr.chromeexperiments.com/.  This link has template code for building a Google Cardboard app using JavaScript.
  • http://p5js.org/ – “…a JavaScript library that starts with the original goal of Processing, to make coding accessible for artists, designers, educators, and beginners, and reinterprets this for today’s web.” This library looks like a great framework for getting started in 2D graphics.  Khan Academy uses a similar framework in their drawing tutorials to computer science.
  • http://www.babylonjs.com/ – 3D graphics library that abstracts the complexities of WebGL. They seem to have a focus of making it simple to get started while making it possible to build complex scenes. For a detailed review of this framework, check this interview from Scott Hanselman.  ( Check out the blog post too )
  • http://paperjs.org/ – “Paper.js is an open source vector graphics scripting framework that runs on top of the HTML5 Canvas. It offers a clean Scene Graph / Document Object Model and a lot of powerful functionality to create and work with vector graphics and bezier curves, all neatly wrapped up in a well designed, consistent and clean programming interface.”
  • http://fabricjs.com/ – Another cool vector graphics library.

 

What’s your favorite JS library for computer graphics?   Let us know in the comments!

 

Make sure Macon’s Google DevFest!

  • Google DevFest: A festival for software developers, artists, and creative thinkers.
    Explore CrowdSourced Art using tools like ThreeJS and Firebase.com, an amazing realtime database framework.
  • Learn more at http://devfest.cs.mercer.edu/
  • When: October 22, 2016 – 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Where: Mercer University Science and Engineering Building

 

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Inspire Curiosity and Creativity in your Young Maker with SparkMacon’s Robotics Workshop

mBot

Through making and tinkering, students learn using their hands, grow their creativity, and become more curious about their world and testing the limits of what is possible. InspiredToEducate.NET and SparkMacon Makerspace have designed a series of workshops to connect students with the essential technology skills of inventing using computer programming, digital fabrication, and robotics.    

Parents and kids are invited to take this workshop together.  It’s a great family activity!

Robotics: This workshop makes a great gift for the young makers in your life to inspire their love of learning and practice their creative skills.   During this hands-on workshop, students will have the opportunity to build robots from scratch using the mBot kit.   Students will love customizing their mBot using puzzle based programming and the easy to assemble construction experience.   You can program and control the robot using a PC, IPad, or mobile phone.    Students take home their mbot to continue the tinkering fun at home.     

Student registration includes a complete mBot robotics kit from Makeblock.cc.

http://www.makeblock.cc/mbot/

  • Workshop length: 3 hours
  • Cost: $95
  • Workshop cost includes a MakeBlock mBlock kit the students take home.
  • This class serves students from age 9 or older.
  • Interested in registering the workshop?  Please register here.
  • Dates
    • Oct 8th from 1pm to 4pm
    • Dec 3rd from 1pm to 4pm

Location for workshops:

Our robotics workshop will be located at SparkMacon Makerspace.

557 Cherry Street, Macon, GA

Funds from these Maker Skills workshops help support the operation of SparkMacon Makerspace.  Parking and location information can be found here.

Hope to see you there!

 

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MakerFaire Projects To Inspire You

Atlanta Maker Faire 2016

SparkMacon Makerspace invited local makers for an amazing road trip to Atlanta Maker Faire in Decatur, GA on Oct 1st! Maker Faire is a gathering of fascinating, curious people who enjoy learning and who love sharing what they can do. From engineers to artists to scientists to crafters, Maker Faire is a venue to for these “makers” to show hobbies, experiments, projects. 

In organizing this road trip, I hoped that we could grow community and relationships in our SparkMacon community and inspire new ideas, business concepts, and project based learning experiences.  We had a great time!  In this blog post, I wanted to share a few stories and projects we got to observe.

My little boy enjoyed learning how to cut styrofoam pieces using a hot wire cutter from Geekspace Gwinnet.   Using this tool, makers can cut styrofoam to craft structures for cosplay and other projects.   Geekspace did a great job presenting their work ranging from amazing robots, cosplay, and kids activities.

I really appreciate the team from Geekspace Gwinnet sharing some of their experiences in growing and sustaining their makerspace and community too.    The conversation reminded me of the importance of growing, empowering, and serving our maker community.

ATL Maker Faire 2

I know that many of our members enjoyed seeing their first drone race.  Drone pilots fly their creations from a first person perspective through a track on a field.  You can see a team named Cyclone FPV running the course here.

 

I want to thank our SparkMacon road trip team on going to this trip with me.  Creativity is always contagious.   I always enjoy sharing Maker Faire with friends and family.    I want to give a special shout out to my brother Francis Rosario and Ronda Teel who helped take pictures to build the video below.  Hope you enjoy it.

 

Make sure to check out the following link to learn more about Atlanta Maker Faire presenters.

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Music credit: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Doctor_Turtle/none_given_2414/peak_beak

 

 
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Cool Projects and Makerspaces to visit at Atlanta Maker Faire 2016

IMG_2965

  • OpenMV – “The OpenMV project is about creating low-cost, extensible, Python powered, machine vision modules”
  • Exploring 3D Printing through Assistive Technologies – “From eNable arms, customized and personalized tools, interfaces, adaptations and functional prototypes – explore how 3D printing can democratize access to and the making of assistive technologies.”
  • Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Team – “We are the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Team from Kennesaw State University. Our team builds robots for a international competition hosted by the navy every year in San Diego. The robots we create are submarines that operate autonomously.”
  • ALGIX 3D – “ALGIX 3D. 3D Printer Filament and Resin. High Performance. Environmentally Sustainable. Engineered to Perform.”
  • The Process: Launching a New Video Game App – “Our booth will consist of a work-in-progress video game developed by our high school students at The LIFE School. The booth will outline their journey in developing the game, key lessons learned and a hands -on demonstration of the game.”
  • Sumo Bot from clubhou.se Makerspace – “Build A Robot. Learn to Code. Have Some Fun. Sumo Robots, 3D Printing, Maker Space from Augusta! Come by and see what we make and do.”  This is the makerspace community that continues to inspire me in maker education.  Make sure to check them out!
  • The Invention Studio at Georgia Tech – “The Invention Studio at Georgia Tech is the nation’s largest student run maker space. In the studio, students are encouraged to design, build and invent regardless of their experience, major or year. Our booth will showcase various student projects.”
  • G3 Robotics & Drones for Good –  “G3 Drones for Good challenges students in grades 6-8 to design, build, and fly their own drone while developing team work, research, and problems-solving skills.”
  • Chaos Corps / Atlanta Robot Fight Club – “The Chaos Corps will be displaying their 250lb BattleBots entry Bombshell; Atlanta Robot Fight Club – Regional robot combat teams will have their personal combat robots on display.”
  • Decatur Makers – “Decatur Makers is a welcoming, family-friendly community of inquisitive, motivated people who work together in a safe environment to discover, understand, design and create interesting things”
  • Solarize Decatur-Dekalb
  • BootstrapCNC Router
  • Aquaponics: The Food Systems of Tomorrow

For a full list of projects, check out this link.

 

 

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Photo credit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maker_Faire#/media/File:Maker_Faire_2008_spinning_lights.jpg

 

 
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3D Modeling Workshop for Game Worlds, Art, and 3D Printing

Learning TinkerCAD

Through making and tinkering, participants will learn S.T.E.A.M. (science, technology, engineering, art and math) skills using their hands, grow their creativity and become more curious about their world and testing the limits of what is possible.

All ages and experience levels are welcome and the workshops are a great activity for the entire family. Parents and kids can also both attend under the same registration fee!

Nov 12, 1-4pm

This Maker Skills Workshop will focus on 3D modeling. You will learn the basics of 3D modeling and designing objects for a 3D printer. Skills from this workshop will empower makers to build elements for video game worlds, art and 3D printed pieces. We will also provide demonstrations of our 3D printing equipment.

 

Google Cardboard
3D printed Google Cardboard

Student work in TinkerCADGame world built by our students.  

 

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Workshops for Building Minecraft Mods, 3D Stuff, Robots, and more!

xwing

Through making and tinkering, students learn using their hands, grow their creativity, and become more curious about their world and testing the limits of what is possible. InspiredToEducate.NET and SparkMacon Makerspace have designed a series of workshops to connect students with the essential technology skills of inventing using computer programming, digital fabrication, and robotics.   Through these workshop students will gain exposure to STEAM skills including coding, 3D modeling, 3D printing, laser cutting, and robot building.  

Parents and kids are invited to take this workshop together.  It’s a great family activity!

Location for workshops:

All workshops will be held at SparkMacon Makerspace.  Funds from these Maker Skills workshops help support the operation of SparkMacon Makerspace.      

Minecraft Mod Building: Do you enjoy building in Minecraft? Are you curious about how video games are built? Minecraft has become a fun platform for learning how to code and fostering your creativity. In this workshop, you’ll learn the core skills needed to build simple Minecraft plugins. Using our puzzle based programming tools, you’ll gain exposure to designing in 3D, sequencing steps, variables and loops.

Minecraft castle built by me and my son.

Students will receive a FREE Minecraft server configured with ScriptCraft so that they can continue building MODS at home.   Register now! Space is limited!

Students must come with their own paid PC/Mac Minecraft login. Students are encouraged to bring their own laptops, however it is not required.

Workshop length: 3 hours

  • Workshop length: 3 hours
  • Cost: $20
  • Interested in registering the workshop?  Send an email to Michael@InspiredToEducate.NET
  • Dates
    • Sept 17th from 1pm to 4pm
    • Nov 5th from 1pm to 4pm

3D Modeling:  Our students will learn the basics of 3D modeling objects and designing stuff for a virtual worlds, video games, and 3D printers.   Skills from this workshop will empower makers to build elements for video game worlds, art, and 3D printed pieces.  We will also provide demonstrations of our 3D printing equipment.

Check out the work from our last workshop!

  • Workshop length: 3 hours
  • Cost: $20
  • Interested in registering the workshop?  Send an email to Michael@InspiredToEducate.NET
  • Dates
    • Sept 24th from 1pm to 4pm
    • Nov 12th from 1pm to 4pm

Student work in TinkerCAD

Robotics: Building upon the programming skills introduced early in the program, students will have the opportunity to build robots from scratch using the mBot kit.   Students will love customizing their mBot using puzzle based programming and the easy to assemble construction experience.   Students take home their mbot to continue the tinkering fun at home.

Student registration includes a complete mBot robotics kit from Makeblock.cc.

http://www.makeblock.cc/mbot/

  • Workshop length: 3 hours
  • Cost: $20 + $75(cost of mBot kit)
  • Interested in registering the workshop?  Send an email to Michael@InspiredToEducate.NET
  • Dates
    • Oct 8th from 1pm to 4pm
    • Dec 3rd from 1pm to 4pm

Laser cutting: Makers will learn the basics of designing for the laser cutter by creating beautiful bookmarks, key chains, or jewelry.  Makers will learn techniques for editing scalable vector graphics for laser cutting jobs using InkScape, a free graphics design tool.   We will also introduce ways to design 3-dimensional work using various tools and cutting patterns.

Laser cutting samples

  • Workshop length: 3 hours
  • Cost: $20 + $10(materials)
  • Interested in registering the workshop?  Send an email to Michael@InspiredToEducate.NET
  • Dates
    • Oct 15th from 1pm to 4pm
    • Dec 10th from 1pm to 4pm

This series will be tons of fun.  Looking forward to seeing you there!

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Atlanta Maker Faire Road Trip!

 

r2d2

Hey Macon Makers! SparkMacon Makerspace wants to invite you for an amazing road trip to Atlanta Maker Faire in Decatur, GA on Oct 1st! Maker Faire is a gathering of fascinating, curious people who enjoy learning and who love sharing what they can do. From engineers to artists to scientists to crafters, Maker Faire is a venue to for these “makers” to show hobbies, experiments, projects. MakerFaire events are called the greatest “show and tell” on the planet.

We believe that the road trip to Atlanta MakerFaire will have the following impacts for our community: 1. It helps inspire our Macon Makers tribe. 2. We’ll grow friendships in our Macon community between our tech community, creatives and artists. 3. We want to expose Macon makers to innovative ideas, tools, business concepts, and art that can be brought back to our local community.4. It’s going to be REALLY fun!

We’ll finish the day with a dinner/drinks meetup of Macon Makers. This will give us an opportunity reflect on the day and hangout.

Let us know that you’re interested in being a part of this road trip. We’d love to coordinate rides or a maker party bus! :)

Sign up for the Atlanta Maker Faire Road Trip today.

 

 

 
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Taking Time Lapse Photos with Your Raspberry Pi

Simple CV

One of my friends from SparkMacon makerspace had a question about taking time lapse photos using a Raspberry Pi.  Since this feels like a fun starter project for many makers, I wanted to share an approach using an easy computer vision library, SimpleCV.   SimpleCV by http://www.sightmachine.com/  enables novice programmers to build computer vision experiences using Python and concise code patterns.  This code should also work on Mac, Linux, Windows, and a Raspberry Pi.

To utilize SimpleCV on your Raspberry Pi, follow the install instructions located here.

Make sure to install a web camera or the Raspberry Pi camera module.

If you’re not familiar with the Python programming language, you can learn the basics from CodeAcademy.com .   I have a few free e-books located on this blog post.

I found a time lapse capture script by larsyencken on github.   That looks really simple.   Copy the following code into a text file named “time_lapse.py.”   

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import os
import SimpleCV
import time

# get access to the camera
cam = SimpleCV.Camera()

# setup a display
disp = SimpleCV.Display((1024, 768))

# this variable is used for naming each file or frame.
i = 0

while disp.isNotDone():
    # wait 2 seconds
    time.sleep(2)

    # capture the image. Display it. Save the image as a JPEG.
    img = cam.getImage()
    img.save(disp)
    img.save('%.06d.jpg' % i)

    # change the filename counter variable.
    i += 1

    if disp.lastLeftButton:
        break

You can run this code by executing the following command:

python time_lapse.py

After running this script, your program should capture a new image every two seconds.  Each frame will be numbered.

If you’re interested in learning more with SimpleCV, make sure to check out their documentation resources.   It’s a fun and easy way to do computer vision.

What other cool ways could you use SimpleCV? We would enjoy hearing your ideas!

 

 

 
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